Case Studies

There are many examples of globally networked learning (GNL) courses that have been mounted in various universities across the world. Below are some examples we find particularly innovative. These examples show the wide-ranging possibilities that exist in course design; partnerships across disciplines, institutions and regions of the world; and the concrete GNL activities that may be integrated into courses. Further case studies may be found here and here.

  • Institutions: Stanford University (United States) and Orebro University (Sweden)
    Field: Cross-cultural rhetoric
    Project: Global curriculum for 15 students in 4 - 6 teams. Assignments include: presenting cultural artifacts; analyzing ads published around the world; examining websites; composing collaboratively a blog post about cultural artifacts.
    Reference: O'Brien & Erikson (2008)
  • Institutions: Farfield University (United States) and Universidad Centroamericana (Nicaragua)
    Field: Global justice, communication and journalism
    Project: The inter-institutional agreement includes a joint curriculum in communication, a joint capstone in global justice, faculty exchanges and study abroad programs.
    Reference: Crabtree, Malespin & Norori (2008)
  • Institutions: University of Wisconsin-Stout (United States), Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (Mexico), University of South Dakota (United States), First Nations
    Field: Indigenous Studies
    Project: The inter-institutional agreement includes a joint curriculum in communication, a joint capstone in global justice, faculty exchanges and study abroad programs.
    Reference: Fitch, Kirby & Amador (2008)
  • Institutions: University of Delaware (United States) and McGill (Canada)
    Field: Management Communication
    Project: Joint course in which students analyzed the business communication practices at enterprises operating in both countries.
    Reference: Starke-Meyerring & Andrews (2006)
  • Institutions: Georgie Institute of Technology (United States); European University at St Petersburg (Russia); and Belkinge Institute of Technology
    Field: Technical communication (Information design and technology) and English
    Project: Classes are separated at first. Then, students introduce themselves through BlackBoard. 80% of the class sessions are asynchronous and 20% are synchronous.
    Reference: Herrinton & Tretyakov (2005); Kennon (2008)
  • Institutions: University of Wisconsin-Stout (United States); Hogeschool Gent (Belgium); Aarhus School of Business (Denmark); Université Paris Diderot (France); Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz (Austria); Università degli studi di Trieste (Italy)
    Field: Technical communication and translation
    Project: In their respective courses, the students write technical texts and send them to students in other countries who translate them. Students communicate by email to provide feedback and to adjust their writing/translation.
    Reference: Mousten, Vandepitte & Maylah (2008)
  • Institutions: City University of Hong Kong (China) and Illinois State University (United States)
    Field: Business communication and professional communication
    Project: Joint project in which students communicate through email and videoconference in order to analyze McDonald's operations in both countries.
    Reference: Du-Bacock & Varner (2008)